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Archive for the ‘Travelogues’ Category

Consider Bardwell Farm

Consider Bardwell Farm

Four years ago, when I first moved from New York to the Boston-area, I can only describe it as a collision of worlds. Although the change of pace is less noticeable for some, it took me extra time to adjust to the relatively gentle mobility of Beantown as compared to that of the Big Apple.

After finding work at Formaggio Kitchen, and as I established a comfort zone with my newly adopted environment, I was given the opportunity through the shop to visit a series of farms in western Vermont. I had never traveled that far north in the United States before, so I jumped at the opportunity.

The trip offered a wonderful introduction to a region extremely diverse in sights, flavors and experiences. Growing up, my grandparents would seek solace from the city life in the mountains of central New York but, as a child, I never appreciated the clarity that environment could impart.

My fellow staffers and I visited three farms on our trip: Consider Bardwell, Twig Farm, and Blue Ledge. During our visit, Twig Farm’s owner and veteran Formaggio Kitchen cheesemonger, Michael Lee, gave a simple, yet nuanced perception of his art. He posited that cheese bears a striking similarity to bones; dependent as they are upon the bonding of calcium and on moisture levels during cooking, curds can be molded into a soft and pliable cheese, or a firmer, more crumble-prone cheese. Michael’s analogy became a sort of leitmotif to reflect upon as we visited other farms in this unspoiled terrain. Each cheesemaker gives life to a different bone in their “body” of a repertoire, and each farm was its own sort of self-sustaining organism or ecosystem.

With the Goats at Twig Farm

With the Goats at Twig Farm

The final, striking aspect of our trip was the use of the honor system, and the collective bartering between farms that eliminates any sense of competition. Cheesemaker Hannah Sessions of Blue Ledge Farm explained that this is a byproduct of the comparative youth of artisan American cheese production, married with the fact that there is still plenty of business for everyone involved.

The sense of place and charge that each of the farms we visited has with their land and livestock is extraordinary. I believe that it is safe to say that this region will continue to serve as a large, untainted sandbox for artisan cheesemakers to create their own corpus and a place where natural city-dwellers like myself can learn to appreciate a different kind of order for many years to come!

Photos by: Kim Beaty

Marino Pawlowski is a romance linguist, enchanting dinner guest, and a cheesemonger and buyer at Formaggio Kitchen Cambridge .

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Gruyère Alpage

Gruyère Alpage

We knew it would be a fast trip, and the time spent waiting for our flight in the Newark airport did not make it any easier. Switzerland was calling and we could not have been any more prepared (and less ready) for what we were going to experience.

We landed in Geneva and made haste to the Jura region of France for a brief stop at Marcel Petite’s famed aging rooms at Fort Sant Antoine. As always, visiting Claude and the crew to taste and pick our wheels of Comté was a resounding success. The Comté offered to us was as spectacular as ever and we were introduced to new fruitières* with all new flavor profiles. This means in a few months, our customers will also be introduced to these new flavors. Exciting, but I digress…

Switzerland was our focus. Leaving France behind, we arrived in Villeneuve on the shores of Lake Geneva (Lac du Monde) to meet with Bernard. Immediately, we were swept up and driven north into the Alpine hills and mountains of Gruyère. We steadily climbed until we reached our first stop, an amazing, small farm where the cheesemaker makes three cheeses, Gruyère, Gruyère Alpage and a small Reblochon style washed rind, as well as some very fresh tasting yogurt. Bernard sells his cheese, but does not age it. This allows the cheesemaker to employ both his son and a full time helper – a nice philosophy that assured us we were dealing with the right people. They had just finished cleaning after their afternoon cheesemaking and excitedly showed us the cave. Hundreds of wheels of Gruyère at all ages sat in meticulous condition. The Gruyère, by the way, was fantastic. Notes made and photos taken, more work had to be done and so we said our goodbyes.

Ihsan in front of Bernard's Cave

Ihsan in front of Bernard’s Cave

Our next stop was Bernard’s own cave. On a winding mountain road, we continued to climb higher in altitude. As we rounded a tight curve, we made a sudden stop. The flat, rocky wall aside the road seemed an odd place to stop until we realized this was the entrance to the cave. This ‘cave’ was originally a Swiss army fort built during World War II (forts make excellent cheese caves).

Traveling in the Cave's Tunnels

Traveling in the Cave’s Tunnels

It originally housed up to 300 men and was connected to other forts through underground passages. While others have tried to convert these forts, few have had the success that Bernard has. He has slowly transformed each room to hold distinct cheeses. The cave is not yet filled, there are numerous rooms and whole upper and lower levels that are still untouched.

Walking through room after room tasting different cheeses was as impressive and fun as it sounds. Discovering unique flavors of Gruyère from different farms, as well as a host of other styles of cheese, was eye-opening. Many of the cheeses had flavor profiles that we had never tasted in the US. The complexity and diversity within a range of such closely related cheeses was astonishing.

After tasting, Bernard took us deep into the mountain. A small door led into a hand carved stairwell heading down at a treacherously steep angle. A long walk down these steps tooks us to a small tunnel with even more rooms. As we neared the end of the tunnel, Bernard opened a door that led to a small wooden bridge that would take us to yet another fort, which a friend of Bernard’s is also using as a cave.

We walked over a gorgeous ravine into the next fort and were offered a visit to see those cheeses, but the hour long walk up deterred us. After all, we already had the task of climbing the 900 steps back to Bernard’s cave (Ihsan swears it was 1,200 steps!). Our legs would be feeling that for days.

The drive back to the lake was a nice prelude to the finish of the day. A wine tasting with a friend of Bernard’s who makes fantastic local wines, followed by a pleasant dinner helped us get ready for the following day.

Making Vacherin Fribourgeois

Making Vacherin Fribourgeois

The next morning, we arrived at Bernard’s cave in Villeneuve where we tasted yet more cheese and, again, we were blown away. Throughout the day, we visited more cheesemakers and farms, tasting, talking and writing as we went. The highlight of the day was our first stop, an Alpage cheese maker in the town of Moléson. By law, the cheese can only be made from May to September, using the milk from cows grazing at certain altitudes, and it must be heated over a wood fire. The old, traditional manner of doing everything by hand includes cutting and straining of the curds, which is quite a sight to behold. We watched as the milk transformed from pure liquid to snow-white curds that would eventually become Vacherin Fribourgeois Alpage. The season was only about three weeks in, so were not able to taste any of the new batches, but we did taste his aged cheeses in the caves, and I am pleased to report that we will have some on our shelves soon!

Tasting Vacherin Fribourgeois

Tasting Vacherin Fribourgeois

A few farms later and our visit drew to a close. Bernard proved to be a fine tour guide through the beautiful mountains of Gruyère. We tasted many excellent cheeses that are sure to become new favorites for staff and customers alike. After we said our goodbyes, we headed into the small town of Nyon for a light dinner of lake fish – a well deserved finish to a quick moving and cheese-filled trip.

To view our current selection of Swiss cheeses, please click here.

*Fruitière is a word used to refer to a co-op where the cheese is made - it is a term used in the French Jura, the Savoie and Swiss Alps.

David Robinson is the International Cheese Buyer and a cheesemonger at Formaggio Kitchen South End, Boston.

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Last fall, I had the opportunity to travel to the Jura with Ihsan and Valerie, owners of the Formaggio Kitchen shops, and visit Fromageries Marcel Petite, affineur (or ager) of Comté cheese.

All cheesemongers on our counters hear a tremendous amount about Fort Saint Antoine where Marcel Petite ages their finest wheels – it is a storied and highly respected place for us – where Philippe Goux, General Manager, and Claude Querry, Chef de Cave, bring wheels of this extraordinary mountain cheese to its full potential. Here are a few photos from my first visit – a very special experience for me as a cheesemonger and cheese lover. (please click on one of the photos to open the slideshow)

Meredith Rottersmann is the General Manager and Classroom Coordinator at Formaggio Kitchen Cambridge.

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Inside One of the Jasper Hill Vaults

Inside a Jasper Hill Vault

Last month, I had the great opportunity to join two co-workers in a pilgrimage to the Cellars at Jasper Hill in Greensboro, Vermont. In previous posts, my colleagues have described the merits of Jasper Hill as the home of award-winning cheeses like Winnimere, as well as an innovative model for sustainable small-scale cheese production. Rather than repeat this much-deserved praise, I hope to share a reflection on my brief time at Jasper Hill as a whirlwind of sights, smells, and of course tastes. The tag line of Jasper Hill is, “A Taste of Place” and thus I will try my best to give you a little taste of my experience in this very unique place. (more…)

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Flying into Paris

Flying into Paris

One of the great perks of working at Formaggio Kitchen is the opportunity to travel around the world in search of delicious foods. Ihsan and Valerie Gurdal, owners of the Formaggio Kitchen family of shops, feel strongly that being on the ground to meet with farmers, affineurs and food producers is the best way to find the most delicious goodies to stock our shelves and fill our cheese cases. That philosophy has yielded and continues to yield marvelously tasty results! (more…)

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Extremadura, Spain

I recently had the opportunity to attend a small festival of food producers in the Extremadura region of Spain with fellow food buyers representing small shops as well as large distributors from around the world. I had never been to Spain before and was thrilled to be able to visit a country with such a rich and diverse culinary history – and to be able to discover new and delicious products for our stores. (more…)

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Tripp and Andrew at Fromageries Marcel Petite

At Fromageries Marcel Petite

Landing in Geneva, our first day began auspiciously with 65°F blue skies and a new convertible (our reserved sedan was unavailable) to drive us west into the Jura. Tripp (domestic cheese buyer for our Cambridge shop), and Sarah (Tripp’s counterpart at the South End), and I marveled at the snow-capped mountains in the eastern distance and how the yellow brilliance of patched rapeseed fields rested calmly in their spaces. The three of us were in France to visit with cheesemakers and food producers, checking in with old friends and making new ones. Climbing up into the hills, we arrived at our first destination, Fromageries Marcel Petite at Fort St. Antoine. (more…)

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Fromageries Marcel Petite's Fort Saint Antoine

Fromageries Marcel Petite’s Fort Saint Antoine

What makes Comté so incredibly special? And, why is it a cheese I find myself drawn to time and again, lured in as if it had cast a spell on me? Of course, it’s one of France’s classic cow milk cheeses – a firm mountain cheese that was among the first to receive protected status. There are the requirements of the appellation that set it apart – Comté cheese must be made with milk from cows of the Montbéliarde (95%) and Simmental (5%) breeds. It must also be made within the regions of Doubs, Jura and Ain in France – and, the cow feed has to be from pastures within a 30km radius of the fruitière making it (a fruitière is a facility where milk from the community is pooled – generally this system exists in areas where large cheeses, like Comté, are made - Parmigiano Reggiano would be a similar example in Italy). (more…)

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VinItalyThis year, my trip to Italy’s most renowned wine show, VinItaly, took on a different emphasis and dynamic. In previous years, navigating thronged pavilions of growers and tasters and trailing fellow importers was at center stage. This time, while those goals remained important, the focus was on introducing Jessica, a talented and emerging wine buyer for the shop, to many of the people that stand behind the Italian wines on our shelves. (more…)

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I recently visited Barrington Coffee at their roastery in Lee, MA, in the heart of the Berkshires. Roastmaster Brian Heck, along with fellow coffee alchemist Paul, guided me through Barrington’s process of coaxing the delicate aromas and fine flavors out of their unroasted, green coffee beans. It takes an artisan’s practiced touch, a connoisseur’s critical taste, and a farmer’s dedication to his crop to create the consistently outstanding coffees Barrington is known for.

Green coffee beans starting to roast

Brian began by guiding me through the roasting process, from bag to finished bean. Barrington Coffee has three roasters, the largest handling up to 60 lbs. and the smallest able to roast as little as 1/4 lb. at a time. When I visited, Brian and Paul were manning all three roasters, producing select origin as well as blended coffees. (more…)

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