Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Beer’

Eric's St. Paddy's Day Beer Recommendations
These days, St. Patrick’s Day is mostly a secular celebration of Irish culture and a day of mindless consumption of way too much Guinness or green beer. As a Boston native, and history buff, March 17 is as much about Evacuation Day as it is about the shamrock-toting saint (read more about Evacuation Day). As the beer buyer at our fancy little food store, I prefer to celebrate both events with a couple of bottles of exemplary craft brew.

Although the craft brewing revolution in Ireland is alive and well, there’s none to be had on this side of the pond and until I find a source, I’m recommending a few domestic ales for your celebrations. (more…)

Read Full Post »

In 75 A.D. the Romans picked a nice spot in what is today southern Wales to build a fort or caer. A few hundred years later Saint Cenydd entrusted the monastery he started there to his son Ffilli, and thus was born the beginnings of the town of Caerphilly. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Before the advent of modern brewing, the traditional German brewing season would finish in March just as the temperatures got high enough to create uncertainty in the brewing process. Because these beers (known as Märzenbier) would be cellared through the summer, they needed to be heartier brews that could hold up until the next brewing season began in September. These malty, robust lagers with their deep copper color and higher alcohol content are traditionally enjoyed during Oktoberfest in the final month before the new brews arrive.

Today, Oktoberfest is a massive party with 6 million people enjoying 7 million liters of beer over the span of 16 days. Despite the lure of such a gathering, we prefer to stay States-side and enjoy our beer buyer Eric’s selection of special seasonal beers available in our stores from September through October.

Our Favorite Oktober Fest Beers

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Hafod at Formaggio Kitchen

Part of what makes Formaggio Kitchen such a special place to work, as you may have gleaned from our other posts, is that our products, and our cheeses in particular, are sourced directly from producers and affineurs rather than second or third hand via American importers and distributors. As you can imagine, if you’ve seen our cheese selection, this is a pretty enormous task, so several of us play a part. My role, among other things, is that of British Isles cheese buyer. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Cheese plate (left to right): Colston Bassett Stilton, dried Turkish figs, Roquefort Vieux Berger, Carlisle wildflower honey, Manchego Añejo, Marcona almonds and Parmigiano-Reggiano

Cheese plate (left to right): Colston Bassett Stilton, dried Turkish figs, Roquefort Vieux Berger, Carlisle wildflower honey, Manchego Añejo, Marcona almonds and Parmigiano-Reggiano

We love teaching our customers about cheese. We love teaching them about wine. About jams and honeys. About our charcuterie. Really, about any kind of food! As a result, it seemed like a no-brainer for us to begin offering tasting classes on Sundays (and occasionally on Wednesday and Saturday nights), giving our customers a more in-depth look at how cheese is made and who is making it.

Thrilled by the positive feedback we had from folks who were keen to learn more about cheese and about food in general, we have been steadily expanding our course offerings. In addition to the ever-popular Cheese 101, we now have a vast array of classes focusing on topics such as Piedmontese wines, American beers, pizza-making or barbecuing! After folks take Cheese 101, they often return for more specialized cheese classes, such as the one we had on Alpine cheeses or one that focused predominantly on blue cheeses. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Mast Brothers chocolate barsThough we may think of Europe as the epicenter of fine chocolate, America is arguably home to the world’s most exciting community of up-and-coming chocolate makers.

What you see in America that you don’t necessarily see elsewhere is a growing crop of “bean-to-bar” chocolate producers – artisans who are working directly with raw cocoa beans, often sourced directly from farmers. In their small labs in places as unlikely as Utah and Missouri, these producers are seeing the cocoa through from its raw form to its natural end — beautiful bars of chocolate that showcase as much of the flavor and character of the original bean as possible.

It sounds like a relatively straightforward process, but it’s actually unusual. A lot of chocolatiers buy pre-made chocolate from larger companies, melt it down and make their own bars or confections. This is not to say their products are necessarily bad or inferior, but just as we support small-craft cheese and wine at Formaggio Kitchen, we also like to support small-craft chocolate as much as possible. (more…)

Read Full Post »

We love cheese at Formaggio Kitchen, but we also love our beer.

You’ll catch a lot of us on the staff stopping by local beer tastings, seeking out new and hard-to-find bottles, and regularly checking out (and sampling) the rotating taps at our favorite Boston-area bars. A few of us also brew our own beer – recent undertakings have included a clone of Stone Ruination IPA, and a beer brewed with fresh cranberries that somehow ended up measuring a whopping 2% ABV (we lovingly call this one “Granny Cran”).

Whenever we can, we also visit breweries to see beer-making in action. It’s fascinating to see beer brewed on a large scale (though many of the craft breweries we like are still considered small players in a giant market), and it’s enlightening to talk to brewers about what goes in to making certain beers and why they taste the way they do. We’ve previously field-tripped it to Sixpoint, Ommegang and Brooklyn Brewery (see related post), all located in New York. Last month, I stopped by Dogfish Head Brewery in Milton, Delaware, and last week, a group of us headed to Portland, Maine, to visit Allagash Brewing Company. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Brooklyn Brewery BeerI was never much of a beer drinker until I moved to England…  There, I gradually came to appreciate the taste of beer when I accompanied colleagues to the pub for a post-work pint or when I would meet friends for an evening out.  Still, I never bought beer and kept it in my fridge – it was just one of those things that I would occasionally have when I was out.  Brooklyn Brewery changed that. (more…)

Read Full Post »

On Wednesday evening, I had the good fortune to be able to sit in on a pig butchering demo here at the shop.  The demo was conducted by Julie, our in-house charcutière, and Jason, the chef at our South End location.  What a pair they made!  Jason did the butchering and Julie spoke about how she uses different parts of the pig to create her delicious porky products.

Getting started!

This demo (and the one happening this coming Wednesday) were a first for Formaggio Kitchen, inspired by Cochon 555 a pig-themed event that is happening in Boston today.  It turns out that there are a lot of fellow pork lovers out there and we were overwhelmed by the response to the first demo we scheduled – so much so that we scheduled a second and still had a lengthy waiting list!  Hopefully we will get to do this again soon!  I even hear some buzz that we may do a similar type of demo with spring lamb…  Stay tuned!

Setting the stage!

A lot of careful preparation went into the class.  I happened to be working on the Sunday three weeks ago when Julie and Jason broke down a small pig from Falter Farm, MA in order to figure out how they wanted to organize their presentation.  (more…)

Read Full Post »

By now you’ve probably (hopefully) heard about our Super Bowl BBQ + Beer Bonanza, February 6-7, here at FK. Inside, we’ll have free tastings of beers from our favorite brewers. Outside, Grillerator Eric will host a special session of our popular summer sidewalk barbecue, cooking up the usual menu of ribs, pulled meats and hot dogs.

Eric has also promised a few specials based on the regional BBQ styles of the two Super Bowl contenders, which probably means something Cajun-style in honor of the NFC-champion New Orleans Saints (think andouille!). Indianapolis, home of the AFC-champion Colts, is a bit more of a head-scratcher, Eric admits, with no well-known BBQ tradition. (The Hoosier State does, however, boast a beloved dessert called sugar cream pie with a filling made of, well, sugar and cream.)

Come by Super Bowl weekend to see what Eric comes up with. And remember that if Minnesota had made it to the big game in place of New Orleans, for better or worse, you might have gotten to try the first-ever pulled lutefisk sandwich.

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 376 other followers

%d bloggers like this: