Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘heirloom apples’

Ten Apple Varieties

Inter-departmental cooperation? We’ve got that in spades! Two Sundays ago, this manifested itself in a team effort between the bakery and the produce departments. Emily, produce buyer and home chef extraordinaire, brought the apples: 10 different kinds, most of them heirloom varieties. I represented for the bakery and turned each variety into an individual mini-crisp and sliced extras for a “raw” tasting. Our goal? To find out which were the best baking and which were the best eating apples. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Heirloom Apples from Scott Farm (Dummerston, VT)

Top to bottom: Franc Rambour, Duchess of Oldenburg, Lamb Abbey Pearmain and Gravenstein.

Crisp autumnal air. The sweet smell of leaves. Dashes of yellows and oranges and reds and browns. A quintessential New England fall. And nothing says fall to me like apples and apple picking.

As a child, roaming the orchards, climbing up the ladder to pick the fruit, and biting into a juicy red McIntosh was what thrilled me. Now that I’m a bit older, I still love to pick apples but, as a produce buyer here at Formaggio Kitchen Cambridge, what really gets my motor going is the sheer variety of apples available today.

There are, of course, the old standbys like Granny Smith and Galas. The New England staples like Cortlands and Macouns. And, with the help of seed savers and the grace of a handful of dedicated growers, like Zeke Goodband of Scott Farm in Dummerston, Vermont, there are heirloom apples. The names themselves are reason to cheer: Ananas Reinette, Hudson’s Golden Gem, Duchess of Oldenburg. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Cabot Clothbound cheddar and heirloom applesSpring may be the season of rebirth, but we can’t help a similar feeling of renewal when September rolls around: new season, new school year, cooler temperatures (at least in the northeast). Autumn is also the time to celebrate the harvest – particularly the new batch of apples, that most emblematic of fall crops. Fresh or preserved, apples are a simple and versatile addition to any cheese plate. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Local Crab Apples

We recently held our first ever Apple Fest at Formaggio Kitchen Cambridge and, ever since, I have had apples on my mind!  For me, apples provoke a range of memories and positive associations but, only recently, did I take the time to delve a little further into the history and science of this fruit.

When I was a child, we used to visit my grandparents’ place in Connecticut and, in their orchard, we were able to pick McIntosh apples straight from the trees.  Eating an apple outside and, remembering the legend of Johnny Appleseed, I would try to plant the odd apple seed.  When I did so, I always envisioned a bountiful apple tree heavy with fruit and looking precisely like the apple I was munching on.  Little did I know that my seed, had it ever come to fruition, would have produced something very different.  Apple seeds are heterozygotes meaning that, like human children, they often bear only a slight resemblance to their parents.  This is why there are so many apple varieties!

The part of me that loves to spend time in the kitchen relishes this time of year – a time that has traditionally brought with it a slew of delicious, apple-derived dishes: apple pie, caramel apples and apple cider to name a few.  The prominence of the apple in the American food psyche is nothing new.  If anything, it is less prominent now than it was a century ago.  In the 19th century, Americans were growing in the region of 14,000 distinct varieties of apples, a period in our history that has been called the “golden age” of pomology.  Apples were reviewed with the same enthusiasm with which people now review movies! (more…)

Read Full Post »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 439 other followers

%d bloggers like this: